Is this the future of crematoriums?

The crematorium could allow people’s ashes to be blasted into the sky as fireworks.

Crematoriums wouldn’t usually be considered ideal fodder for groundbreaking design.

And yet a design firm is proposing a crematorium in Los Angeles that appears to have more in common with the Starship Enterprise than it does a traditional place for commemorating the dead.

The “ECO CREMATION – Holographic Recycling Crematorium” design by Margot Krasojević Architects proposes famed seaside spot Santa Monica as the location for the crematorium, which would use solar energy and bio-fuel gas for cremations, in a bid to reduce its environmental impact.

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The innovations don’t stop there, with some very unusual post-cremation options for loved ones, including exploding the ashes in the sky as part of a fireworks display.

“The ways of memorialising the dead are becoming more and more varied, and this crematorium offers all three services of turning the ashes into a tattoo, a concrete reef or even fireworks,” the designers say.

The crematorium would be constructed at Santa Monica in Los Angeles.

“Cremation has become more popular than burial as more people are living nomadic lives, and the manner in which cremains are incorporated into every day living rather than a plot in the ground is a reflection of the society we live in today.”

Margot Krasojević Architects says the buildings design is inspired by Santa Monica’s piers, boardwalks and coastline, with an arch construction and cantilevered canopy, intended to give it the appearance of taking flight.

Other features are both design-based and functional.

“Parabolic reflectors surround the crematorium chamber and can be angled to obtain the strongest solar concentration. The chamber focuses on solar energy in order to be able to cremate a body without relying on backup energy provision.”

The crematorium would also feature a “garden of remembrance” and could be constructed with a budget of $12 million, according to the designers.